siucJones Archive

Index to photographs from of Igbo music, alusi/arunsi (shrines), shrine objects, architecture and other cultural artifacts

All photographs by G. I. Jones

Copyright to these photographs belong to the G. I. Jones estate and is managed by the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at University of Cambridge. Reproduction for publication is prohibited without the prior written permission of the copyright holder.

Anyone wishing to obtain rights to use any of these images in a publication or museum exhibit should direct inquiries to the Senior Assistant Curator at
cumaa@hermes.cam.ac.uk
This archive was produced by John C. McCall with the cooperation of Ursula Jones.

I
t was created as part of a project funded by grants from The English Speaking Union and Southern Illinois University.

Production facilities were generously provided by the African Studies Centre, University of Cambridge.



Igbo Musicians


Instruments: udu (pot drum), two
small membrane drums, on small
ogene (iron bell) and a whistle



three small drums and two basket
shakers, Amuda Village, Isu Ochi





Some Ikoro (slit drums)


Male carving at one end of
large ikoro drum, Ohafia

Female carving at other end
of large ikoro drum, Ohafia

Small ikoro drum, Ohafia

Ufie drum, Southern Ikwerri


Alusi or Arunsi (shrines)


Alusi priest in his shrine


Alusi Nri-Awka

Alusi

Ibudu Orlu

Juju to protect crops Orlu

Alusi Tutelary and fertility juju, Ishieke, Isu


Alusi Tutelary and fertility
 juju -- detail, Ishieke, Isu

Alusi Tutelary and fertility
juju -- detail, Ishieke, Isu

Ibudu Mud shrine made to
protect and prosper a household

Pyramids Nsude village shrine, Abaja, Northern Igbo

Jones posing in front of a
pyramid Nsude village shrine,
Abaja, Northern Igbo


Alusi With Ikenga and other ritual
objects, Orsu, West Isuama Igbo

Alusi The same shrine with its
priest (seated) and it's osu ("juju
 slave"), Orsu, West Isuama Igbo


Alusi With its priest and its
 ritual iron belled staff, Orsu,
 West Isuama Igbo

Alusi Orsu, West Isuama Igbo

Alusi Orsu, West Isuama Igbo

Alusi Nri-Awka Igbo

One of a group of Alusi figures Nri-Awka Igbo

Alusi Several of the same group of Alusi figures

Alusi Another shot of the above shrine, Obioma town, Abaja, Northern Igbo


Alusi Figure in another shrine of a tutelary deity of one of the adjacent villages erected on the road from Udi to Ngwo on the escarpment above Enugu township, Obioma town, Abaja, Northern Igbo

Alusi Shrine of a tutelary deity of one of the adjacent villages erected on the road from Udi to Ngwo on the escarpment above Enugu township, Obioma town, Abaja, Northern Igbo


Ikenga


Ikenga Nri-Awka Igbo

Ikenga Amobia, Nri-Awka Igbo (Now in Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford (1938 15 43)


Ikenga Nimo, Nri-Awka Igbo (Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford (1938 15 43)

Three Ikenga Nimo, Nri-Awka Igbo

Ikenga Achalla, Nri-Awka Igbo


Another view of the same Ikenga Nri-Awka Igbo

Ikenga Nimo, Nri-Awka Igbo (Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford (1938 15 43)
 
Two Ikenga Nri-Awka Igbo

Ikenga Nri-Awka Igbo

Wood carver Carving Ikenga

Okike, Ikenga and other
shrines North Ika


Ofo, uxurhe and other pieces [includes Ikenga], North Ika

Portable household shrine
"I was not long enough in the area to find out the names and function of the two figures. One looks like an ancestral figure and one an Ikenga." North Ika


Agwu Nsi Figures


Agwu Nsi figures (Dibia) Nri-Awka Igbo

Agwu Nsi figures (Dibia) Nri-Awka Igbo

Agwu Nsi figure (Dibia) Nri-Awka Igbo



Ceremonial bowls (okwa)
Okwa Nzu (chalk bowls)

Jones notes: 'If you wish to show that a stranger visiting your village is your guest and under your protection, you present him with a piece of chalk (local gypsum) which he takes and draws two white lines on his wrist and then returns. Big men have a special bowl (okwa) for this chalk (nzu).'



Okwa Nzu Abiriba
Held by the owner's wife
(note body painting).

Okwa Nzu Abiriba Igbo

Okwa Nzu Item Igbo


Ceremonial food bowls

Jones notes: 'In addition to kola, a visitor should be offered food. This is reduced to a token meal in which the visitor is presented with a small piece of preserved meat (usually a piece of boiled hide). on this type of dish. He is expected to cut off a small piece of this on the cutting block, to add a protion of the sauce from the central hollow to it by dipping it in or by using an iron spoon and then to eat it.'


Okwa Ezza Igbo -- note small iron spoon

Okwa Ezza Igbo

Okwa The figure in the entre forms the lid of a circular hollow which should hold the sauce into which the piece of meat is dipped.

Okwa Unknown provenence



Other Igbo cultural items


Wari board (game)

Calabash containers with basketry coverings

House in Owerri Figure of a motor transport magnate and symbols of his (horse) power

A small boy with his doll Son of the court clerk of Eza Court. The string of beads around his waist is unusual from males and is probably worn for 'medicinal' or 'magical' reasons.

House under construction Roof is made from raffia palm branches (locally known as bamboo poles) prior to the attachment to them of tile like mats made out of raffia palm leaves (southern Igbo)


House under construction (southern Igbo)

House with inset plates South Ikwerri

Interior of house with plates inset in walls South Ikwerri

House with carved panels Nri-Awka

Train juju Interior of the house of the train juju (alusi) showing the engine. Made by the people of Nike in honor of the railway that runs through their land. (Enugu)


Train juju Nike, Enugu

Train juju, detail Hausa man on a horse, local man in front. Nike, Enugu


Woman with baby (The baby is covered with chalk for medicinal purposes.)

"Awka" stool Showing decoration of the pedestal, Amobia village, Nri-Awka

Carving a stool Early stages of carving a stool similiar to the one shown above, Amobia village, Nri-Awka


Carving a stool Later stages of the same carving process, Amobia village, Nri-Awka

Another type of stool Amobia village, Nri-Awka

Wood carver Making a lidded bowl

Bottles carved out of wood In the shape of local clay pots. They are hollow and will hold liquids. The technique is to cut a piece out of the side to enable one to hollow the interior and then replace it.

Child with modern carvings A woman, leopard and policeman
Nri-Awka

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