Illinois! Illinois!

Illinois Comes of Age: 1914-1945

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1079. McCORD, JOSEPH, 1880-1943.
The Piper's Tune, [by] Joseph McCord. Philadelphia: Macrae Smith Company, 1938. 304p.
Caradad, recently orphaned, sells her ranch in Oklahoma and starts out to see the world, making a point of stopping first in Chicago to look up her old friend and hero, Terry. But he turns out to be something less than the man she had thought him to be. Fortunately a better man enters the picture. This light romance has a weak and unlikely plot.
Book Review Digest, 1938, p. 616.
1080. McCUTCHEON, JOHN TINNEY, 1870-1949.
The Restless Age, by John T. McCutcheon. Author of In Africa, Etc. Illustrated with Cartoons by the Author. Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Publishers, [1921.] 218p.
Tom Wickham, representative of thousands of discontented youth following World War I, shuns the stability of farm life for the lure of fast and easy money to be made in the city. Moving to Chicago, Tom encounters difficulty finding a job. When he finds one, he experiences as much difficulty keeping it. Only where women are concerned does Tom experience any degree of success, and in that area he is glutted. At last, a sadder but wiser Tom--battered, browbeaten, and disillusioned by city life--returns to the farm to marry the girl next door and live happily ever after. Although the plot is far from original, The Restless Age reflects a truth that cannot be denied, for McCutcheon, a writer and cartoonist for the Chicago Tribune during the time described, had ample opportunity to observe the trend which he considered serious, but treated half-humorously in his novel.
1081. MacDONALD, JESSICA NELSON NORTH, 1894-
Arden Acres, [by] Jessica Nelson North. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, [1935.] 277p.
The Great Depression of the 1930s made criminals of honest men, turned children into scavengers, caused the breakdown of family ties, and set neighbor against neighbor in the bitter game of survival. In Arden Acres, a suburb near Joliet, the Chapin family are among the first to feel the effects of the times. Tim Chapin, an unemployed carpenter with a wife, five children, and an aging mother-in-law to support, picks up odd jobs building chicken coops, digging ditches, doing house repair and remodeling, and supplements his income through government relief. When jobs become non-existent, Tim casts aside ideals and morals for the greater necessity of feeding his family, and accepts the only job available--dealing in stolen cars. Told from the viewpoint of Joan, the oldest Chapin daughter, Arden Acres is a story of awakening love and family devotion, as well as a poignant social commentary on the state of life in America during the worst economic disaster in modern history.
Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 751.
1082. McEVOY, JOSEPH PATRICK, 1895-1958.
Denny and the Dumb Cluck, [by] J. P. McEvoy. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1930. 208p. (The Inner Sanctum Novels)
In eight short stories McEvoy airs his feelings toward the greeting card industry through an analysis of the relationship of Denny Kerrigan, Gleason Card Company's Star salesman, and Chicago shop girl Doris Miller, the dumb cluck of the title, whom he finally marries.
CONTENTS: Heart Throbs.--Father's Day.--Mother's Boy.--Dear Little You.--Square as a Die.--Lonely Heart.--Iceberg.--Honeymoon.
Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 658.
1083. McEVOY, JOSEPH PATRICK, 1895-1958.
Mister Noodle, An Extravaganza by J. P. McEvoy. Author of Show Girl, Hollywood Girl, and Denny and the Dumb Cluck. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1931. 186p.
A letter from Mother, a scrap of drama, a newspaper clipping, a telegram--combine to create a literary collage certain to delight the most discriminating reader. Taking a young man from a southern Illinois apple orchard, McEvoy drops him headlong into a drawing class at the Art Institute, then unleashes him on the world as a comic strip artist for the Chicago Star. But Chic Kiley succeeds. Although he can only draw profiles, people from coast to coast read, understand, and enjoy the simple, heartwarming humor of Kiley's Mr. Noodle. When all seems perfect for Kiley, an accident followed by scandal has disasterous effects on the popularity of his creation. Undaunted, Kiley kills the strip to launch another, Mr. Whosis, in the same tradition. While poking gentle fun at the creator of the comic strip, the analyst who reads profundity into it, and the reader who is hopelessly addicted to its repetitious and mundane humor, McEvoy manages to draw forth several well-deserved chuckles in appreciation of his own comic style.
Book Review Digest, 1931, p. 664.
1084. McGRATH, TOM.
Copper, A Novel by Lieutenant Tom McGrath. Boston: Bruce Humphries, Inc., Publishers, [1941.] 317p.
Mike Casey joins the Chicago Police Department as a rookie cop in the 1920s, when crime runs rampant through the city, police officers are expected to take bribes, and an honest judge seems nonexistent. Attempting to maintain his integrity in spite of his surroundings, Mike is exposed daily to danger in the streets, jealousy among the ranks of his fellow officers, payoffs in the courtrooms, and behind-the-scenes political graft. Then Tim Mannion is elected mayor of Chicago and things begin to change. Mike is put in charge of a special troop called Mannion's Cossacks, and ordered to clean up the town. The story must have some basis in fact, but often appears exaggerated and strained, the central character too tough and uncompromising, the action too brutal, the evidence too circumstantial. Yet, Mike barges into each case in gunfighter fashion. His ego pinned to his lapel and his hand on his revolver, he shoots first and asks questions later. But he's always right! One can only hope that Mike Casey is not a representative example of Chicago's Boys in Blue.
1085. MacHARG, WILLIAM BRIGGS, 1872-1951, and BALMER, EDWIN, 1883-1959.
The Blind Man's Eyes, by William MacHarg and Edwin Balmer. With Illustrations by Wilson C. Dexter. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1916. 368p.
In order to prove his innocence, a convicted murderer escapes and joins the family of the blind judge who has sentenced him to death. Suspense builds steadily as the blind man puzzles over his guest's identity, as those involved appear on the scene to influence and implicate, and as a love affair develops to cloud the issues. The novel is set on a cross-country train from San Francisco to Chicago and on the judge's northern Illinois estate.
Book Review Digest, 1916, p. 359.
1086. MacHARG, WILLIAM BRIGGS, 1872-1951, and BALMER, EDWIN, 1883-1959.
The Indian Drum, by William MacHarg and Edwin Balmer. With Frontispiece by W. T. Benda. Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1917. 367p.
A mystery surrounding the disappearance of Ben Justin Corvet, Chicago shipping magnate, is explained only after the wreck of a ferry on Lake Michigan. Superstition clouds the issue and uncooperative people impede progress, but the forces of nature bring the mystery to a logical conclusion. The fury of the Great Lakes in storm weather is vividly depicted in this dated but entertaining novel of suspense.
Book Review Digest, 1917, p. 358-9.
1087. McKAY, ALLIS.
Woman About Town, a Novel by Allis McKay. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1938. 279p.
An ordinary theme and a standard plot are given a shot of adrenalin by an author who writes with drive, conviction, honor, and a thorough knowledge of her subject. Leila Gersten, a young divorcee working for an advertising agency, longs for the companionship and security she experienced as a married women. Her work and her friends occupy her mind, but they do not fill the void left by her former husband; a situation which makes her a prime target for the advances of a bright new artist in the agency. Chicago in 1928 has much to offer an unattached, financially independent female, and Leila takes full advantage of the situation. Woman About Town is a tale of prohibition, speakeasies, an expanding economy, gangs, jazz, and the liberated woman, and Allis McKay conveys the timbre of these times as few authors have been able to do.
Book Review Digest, 1938, p. 622.
1088. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
Death Among Doctors, [by] James G. Edwards, M. D., [pseud.] Garden City, New York: Published for The Crime Club by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1942. 272p.
Administrative changes at Monmouth City Hospital precipitate a series of personal and professional crises resulting in murder. Victor Bondurant, former chief of Monmouth's Homicide Bureau, is enticed from retirement to work on the case.
Book Review Digest, 1942, p. 503.
1089. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
Death Elects a Mayor, [by] James G. Edwards, M. D., [pseud.] New York: Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Co., Inc., 1939. 274p.
Checking into Monmouth City Hospital seems a good political maneuver for Mayor Patrick McGuire, until he is murdered in his bed. Former Inspector Bondurant is provided with leisure time activities as he probes into the case.
Book Review Digest, 1939, p. 635.
1090. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
F Corridor, by James G. Edwards, M. D., [pseud.] A murderer framed an alibi so clever that it could only be broken by the stars! Garden City, New York: Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1936. 275p.
Luella Ring's hospitalization proves fatal to her doctor, an intern, her husband, and finally Luella, before Inspector Bondurant and Dr. Ravel disclose the murderer.
Book Review Digest, 1936, p. 301.
1091. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
Murder in the Surgery, by James G. Edwards, M. D., [pseud.] A relentless murderer stalked the hospital, employing all the aids of modern science, but Inspector Bondurant knew that while science might conceal the method of murder, it could never control the emotions which had motivated the crime. Garden City, N[ew] Y[ork:] Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1935. 298p.
The murder of Ann Stokes, a nurse at Chicago's Monmouth Memorial Hospital, is followed closely by a chain of strange events which temporarily mystify Inspector Bondurant.
Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 299.
1092. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
The Odor of Bitter Almonds, by James G. Edwards, M. D., [pseud.] Garden City, New York: Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Co., Inc., 1938. 270p.
Two deaths at the Glenview Sanatorium for Nervous Diseases appear to be murder and suicide until a third death occurs. Inspector Bondurant, formerly of the Chicago Police Department, comes out of retirement to investigate.
Book Review Digest, 1938, p. 631.
1093. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
The Private Pavilion, by James G. Edwards, [pseud.] An authentic and exciting hospital mystery by the author of Murder in the Surgery. Garden City, N[ew] Y[ork:] Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1935. 273p.
The death of a patient in Monmouth Memorial Hospital after she has been reported in satisfactory condition reflects on Paul Raven's reputation as a doctor. To avoid a possible malpractice suit, Dr. Raven delves into the case and discovers at least a half-dozen people who wish the patient dead, each for a different reason. Inspector Bondurant helps him out of his predicament.
Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 300.
1094. MacQUEEN, JAMES WILLIAM, 1900-1954.
Sex Is Such Fun, by Jay McHugh, [pseud.] New York: Godwin, Publishers, 1937. 284p.
A strange little man creates pandemonium in the quiet suburb of Glenview when he introduces his discovery, a potent aphrodisiac, into Glenview society. Sex Is Such Fun has been likened to the hilarious and risque tales of Thorne Smith but the comparison is overdrawn, for the novel occasionally approaches hilarity but more often falls somewhere in the realm of the ridiculous.
1095. MARQUIS, DON ROBERT PERRY, 1878-1937.
The Revolt of the Oyster, by Don Marquis. Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1922. 229p.
See No. 578.
1096. MARSHALL, SIDNEY.
Some Like It Hot, by Sidney Marshall. New York: William Morrow and Company, 1941. 278p. (A Morrow Mystery)
Scott Bennett, a Chicago radio personality, tries his hand at amateur sleuthing when he realizes that he is the prime suspect in this mediocre mystery story of the early 1940s.
Book Review Digest, 1941, p. 604.
1097. MARTING, RUTH LENORE, 1907-
Breathe No More, My Lady, by Hilea Bailey, [pseud.] Garden City, N[ew] Y[ork:] Published for The Crime Club by Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1946. 254p.
Hilea Bailey, daughter of private investigator Hilary Bailey, works closely with her father doing most of his leg work, since he is crippled with arthritis. In Breathe No More, My Lady, Hilea delves into the plots and sub-plots surrounding the carbon monoxide death of Caroline van Heest. No exact setting is ever given for this series of mystery novels, however all evidence indicates a Central Illinois locale.
Book Review Digest, 1946, p. 552.
1098. MARTING, RUTH LENORE, 1907-
Give Thanks to Death, [by] Hilea Bailey, [pseud. Garden City, New York:] Published for The Crime Club by Doubleday, Doran & Co., Inc., 1940. 270p.
A mentally disturbed woman, a savage guard dog, an eerie mansion, and murder combine to confound Hilea and Hilary Bailey for a few suspenseful moments.
Book Review Digest, 1940, p. 613.
1099. MARTING, RUTH LENORE, 1907-
The Smiling Corpse, [by] Hilea Bailey, [pseud.] Garden City, New York: Published for The Crime Club by Doubleday, Doran and Company, Inc., 1941. 274p.
Hilea Bailey invades the quiet sanctity of the funeral parlor to investigate a double murder for her detective father.
Book Review Digest, 1941, p. 606.
1100. MARTING, RUTH LENORE, 1907-
What Night Will Bring, [by] Hilea Bailey, [pseud.] New York: Published for The Crime Club by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1939. 277p.
In this, the first of the Hilea Bailey series, an advertising executive hires retired investigator Hilary Bailey, and his daughter Hilea, to find the person who is stealing the firm's best advertising campaigns. Hilea discovers murder. Through her quick action and her father's infallible logic the case is soon solved.
Book Review Digest, 1939, p. 45.
1101. MASSELINK, BEN, 1919-
The Crackerjack Marines, by Ben Masselink. Boston [and] Toronto: Little, Brown and Company, [1959.] 275p.
Pfc. George Toliver has been in the Marines for five months when the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor in December, 1941. Within the month he is promoted to sergeant and sent to work in a Chicago recruiting office. While Marine regulars fight and die at Corregidor, Midway, and Guadalcanal, Toliver participates in parades, fund raising dinners, and movie premieres, drinks, scours the neighborhood for unescorted women, and carouses with his buddies--all for the sake of the war effort. There is nothing exceptional about The Crackerjack Marines, either in plot or execution, but it does convey the delirium that was Chicago during the war years.
Book Review Digest, 1960, p. 900-1.
1102. MASTERS, EDGAR LEE, 1869-1950.
The Tide of Time, by Edgar Lee Masters. New York and Toronto: Farrar & Rinehart, Incorporated, [1937.] 682p.
See Nos. 180 and 586.
1103. MAXWELL, WILLIAM KEEPERS, 1908-
The Folded Leaf, by William Maxwell. New York and London: Published by Harper & Brothers, 1945. 310p.
Two lonely school boys, Lymie Peters and Spud Latham, form a friendship that lasts into adulthood despite totally different temperaments. The author captures in minute detail the flavor of the 1920s and the characters of the two boys as they attend public school in Chicago, venture forth to college in Indiana, fall in love with the same girl and emerge into adulthood stronger and more understanding for having known one another.
Book Review Digest, 1945. p. 480.
1104. MAXWELL, WILLIAM KEEPERS, 1908-
They Came Like Swallows, by William Maxwell. New York and London: Published by Harper & Brothers, 1937. 267p.

The autumn of 1918 brings the epidemic of Spanish influenza to central Illinois, and tragedy to the Morison family. First Bunny, then Robert, then Elizabeth, their mother, contract the disease. Bunny and Robert recover; their mother does not. They Came Like Swallows is a beautiful, touching portrait of Elizabeth Morison as seen by the three who love her most--her sons, Bunny and Robert, and James, her husband. This, William Maxwell's second novel, is simple, unpresuming and totally effective, presenting each personality with a tenderness that few authors can achieve without resorting to gross sentimentality.

Book Review Digest, 1937, p. 677-8.
1105. MAYER, JANE ROTHSCHILD, 1903-, and SPIEGEL, CLARA E. GATZERT.
Instruct My Sorrows, by Clare Jaynes, [pseud.] New York: Random House, [l942.] 383p.
Jessica Drummond, Chicago socialite, young widow, and mother of two teen-age boys, endures the shock of her husband's sudden death, adjusts to widowhood, and discovers that she can love again in a novel that spans a two-year period in the early 1940s. Instruct My Sorrows is well written but the plot is thin and easily predictable after the first few pages.
Book Review Digest, 1942, p. 399.
1106. MAYER, JANE ROTHSCHILD, 1903-, and SPIEGEL, CLARA E. GATZERT.
My Reputation, A Novel by Clare Jaynes, [pseud.] Originally published as Instruct My Sorrows. Cleveland and New York: The World Publishing Company, [1944.] 288p.
My Reputation is a reprint of the authors' earlier work, Instruct My Sorrows.
1107. MAYER, JANE ROTHSCHILD, 1903-, and SPIEGEL, CLARA E. GATZERT.
These Are the Times, A Novel by Clare Jaynes, [pseud.] New York: Random House, [1944.] 273p.
John Kenyon, an orthopedic surgeon in one of Chicago's major hospitals, and Judith, his wife, seem to have a perfect marriage until the advent of World War II threatens to separate them. When told that John has been appointed to an important post in the Army Medical Corps, Judith begins a frantic campaign to prevent his accepting the position. Using every ploy at her command, she succeeds only in exposing her selfish nature and in ultimately wrecking her marriage. These Are the Times explores a social problem which is aggravated by the conditions that war imposes. The authors display a thorough understanding of their subject but become over-dramatic in their presentation.
Book Review Digest, 1944, p. 386-7.
1108. MERWIN, SAMUEL, 1874-1936.
Goldie Green, by Samuel Merwin. Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Publishers, [1922.] 341p.
It is the 1920s when good girls are still courted in the front parlor, attend social functions escorted by their mothers, and wait patiently to be discovered by boys of suitably marriageable age and financial status. But Marigold Green is a new breed of girl discontent with marriage, family, and women's place. In the "... new America, luxuriously pagan, given to jazz dancing and pocket flasks and continuous aimless motion," Goldie wants to be a participant rather than a spectator. Relying on basic intuition and impulse, she defies her family to become Sunbury's first businesswoman. Insurance for man's newest fascination, the automobile, occupies her time and energy until an opportunity in theater management is turned into an unbelievably profitable venture through her amazing business agility. Yet family problems arise to plague her; the omnipresent businessman seems forever on the make; and the sincere, lovable marrying-type causes her no end of distress. But Goldie maintains full command of all she surveys whether it be suburban Sunbury or metropolitan Chicago; and her calculations and maneuvers, though somewhat naive by today's standards, provide hours of pleasant, refreshing entertainment.
Book Review Digest, 1922, p. 367.
1109. MILLER, FRANCESCA FALK, 1888-
The Sands, The Story of Chicago's Front Yard, by Francesca Falk Miller. Chicago: Valentine-Newman, Publishers, 1948. 215p.
See Nos. 186 and 598.
1110. MONTROSS, LOIS FERNE SEYSTER, 1897-
Among Those Present, by Lois Seyster Montross. New York: George H. Doran Company, [1927.] 287p.
Crises in the lives of ordinary people are Mrs. Montross' major concern in these eleven stories collected from periodicals. Seven stories: "How Two Strangers Waited for Dawn," "The Man Who Was God," "A Round Robin," ''Why Miss Shaley Slept in Her Wrapper," "Near a Park," "Rickard's Daughter," and "Georgy, Porgy, Prodigy" are set in Illinois.
CONTENTS: The Clever Accomplice.--How Two Strangers Waited for Dawn.--The Man Who Was God.--A Round Robin.--Why Miss Shaley Slept in Her Wrapper.--Near a Park.--Rickard's Daughter.--Georgy, Porgy, Prodigy.--Love in a Mist.--Iron Dogs.--Almost a Giant.
Book Review Digest, 1927, p. 514.
1111. MONTROSS, LOIS FERNE SEYSTER, 1897-
No Stranger to My Heart, by Lois Montross. New York [and] London: D. Appleton-Century Company, Incorporated, 1937. 281p.
Allison runs away from her unconventional family and gets a job in Chicago where she meets and immediately falls in love with a young lawyer. Fortunately, he is instantly attracted to her disarming honesty, and they waste no time in getting married. When they settle down in Jeremiah, Illinois, where he practices law, and Allison is confronted with his family's expectations of her as a young matron of society, she soon feels her husband's love slipping away. The author's exuberant style and flair for the outlandish make this light romance particularly rich in warmth and humor.
Book Review Digest, 1937, p. 704.
1112. MONTROSS, LOIS FERNE SEYSTER, 1897-
The Perfect Pair, [by] Lois Montross. Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1934. 311p.
Both Meredith Hazlitt and Howard Granville have breeding, good looks, wealth, ideals, and personality. When they meet and begin to keep steady company during their college years, their families and friends pronounce them the perfect pair, and propel them headlong into an engagement. Fortunately the two prove also to be somewhat willful when each discovers love heedless of wealth and position. Set on an unidentified college campus which must certainly be the University of Illinois, The Perfect Pair reflects sorority life during the 1920s, although creating a rather idyllic picture of the entire college experience.
Book Review Digest, 1934, p. 653.
1113. MONTROSS, LYNN, 1895-1961.
East of Eden, by Lynn Montross. New York and London: Harper & Brothers, Publishers, 1925. 299p.
Lynn Montross goes a step beyond the ordinary farm novel in East of Eden. It is true that he portrays a stereotyped elder daughter, overlooked by the world and resigned, at twenty-four, to maidenhood; he portrays a typically rebellious son who abandons farm life, but returns to the land when he is needed; he portrays a staunch, slow-witted farmer similar to heroes in innumerable farm novels; and he pits discontented youth against their landlocked elders in a story that has been told and retold. The ingredient that makes East of Eden more than just another novel of the middle west is the excellent coverage of the beginnings of the agrarian revolt. During the years of prosperity immediately following World War I, the Midwestern farmer suffered untold hardship because of wild speculation and power struggles on the Chicago Board of Trade. This crisis in agriculture spurred a few farsighted farmers to band together to seek regulative legislation and better methods of marketing their own grain. It is this, the fight over the Lantz bills in the Illinois Legislature, the birth and untimely death of the Grain Growers Incorporated marketing enterprise, and their profound effects on American agriculture that set East of Eden apart from the rest.
Book Review Digest, 1925, p. 487.
1114. MONTROSS, LYNN, 1895-1961.
Half Gods, by Lynn Montross. Co-Author of "Town and Gown." New York: George H. Doran Company, [1924.] 296p.
Frances Leeper returns to Willow Ridge, Illinois, at age twenty-five, after four years of college, a broken marriage, and a year of total independence, to resume a former lifestyle with her parents in her childhood home. Readjustment to small-town life and mores, including strict parental rule, religious zealousness, and moral circumspection prove difficult for Frances until she and Reverend Frederick Eckert, minister of the Willow Ridge Methodist Episcopal Church, discover a mutual need for understanding and compromise. Half Gods is realism pushed to its utmost. No detail of character, plot, social background, or locale is left untouched in this novel of suburbia in the 1920s.
Book Review Digest, 1924, p. 412.
1115. MONTROSS, LYNN, 1895-1961, and MONTROSS, LOIS FERNE SEYSTER, 1897-
Fraternity Row, by Lynn and Lois Montross, New York: George H. Doran Company, [1926.] 308p.
Campus life in the 1920s, with emphasis on fraternal and social activities, is the major concern of the authors of these sixteen short stories, given continuity by one central character and a common university setting. Although the university is never identified, all clues indicate the University of Illinois.
CONTENTS: The Antiquated Sheik.--A Bigger Better Halfback.--The Reform of the Deans.--Mid-Victorian.--Red Hot Alma Mater.--The Boys in the House.--Biggest in the World.--The Balmy Old Duck and the Butterfly.--Diogenes Discovers Andy.--The Mixer and the Mutant.--The P. G. with Rouged Ear Tips.--Thais and the Rev. Mr. Mennen.--What Was So Fugitive.--The Rabbit in the Hat.--City of Fireflies.--The State vs. Protheroe.
Book Review Digest, 1926, p. 492.
1116. MONTROSS, LYNN, 1895-1961, and MONTROSS, LOIS FERNE SEYSTER, 1897-
Town and Gown, by Lynn Montross and Lois Seyster Montross. New York: George H. Doran Company, [1923.] 283p.
Thirteen short stories written by a popular husband and wife team excel in mood, atmosphere, and setting. Characters change from story to story, with some figuring in more than one episode, but the Midwestern university (assumed to be the University of Illinois) that supplies the background remains constant throughout.
CONTENTS: Peter Warshaw.--The Faculty and the Creaking Shirt.--The Fusser.--Girls Who Pet.--Yellow.--Dry as Dust.--The First Man.--Unity, Coherence and Emphasis.--Bass Drums.--The Strangest Serenade.--Between the Four Seas.--A Blind Date, Cousin Lottie and the Cat.--When Greek Meets Barb.
Book Review Digest, 1923, p. 360-1.
1117. MOODY, MINNIE HITE, 1900-
Old Home Week, by Minnie Hite Moody. New York: Julian Messner, Inc., Publishers, [l938.] 277p.
A small prairie town in central Illinois during the Depression is the setting for this completely improbable family-sized romance. Not only are the son and daughter smitten by new loves when the carnival and attendant personnel come to town for Old Home Week, but old sweethearts return to tempt Mother and Dad, and even Great-Grandma preparing to celebrate her one hundredth birthday, gets a share of the romance. The description of small-town life and summer festivities in the 1930s is somewhat informative, but the plot strains awkwardly to hold together an unlikely chain of events that must have taxed a reader's credulity even in 1938.
Book Review Digest, 1938, p. 683-4.
1118. MOODY, MINNIE HITE, 1900-
Once Again in Chicago, by Minnie Hite Moody. New York: Alfred H. King, [1933.] 268p.
See No. 603.
1119. MORLEY, CHRISTOPHER DARLINGTON, 1890-1957.
Kitty Foyle, [by] Christopher Morley. Philadelphia, New York [and] Toronto: J. B. Lippincott Company, [1939.] 340p.

An in-depth study of the white collar girl of the 1920s and 1930s this novel, written in the stream of consciousness style focuses on Philadelphia-bred Kitty Foyle as she matures from childhood through adolescence to adulthood. A major portion of the novel takes place in Philadelphia and New York, but lengthy interludes are set in Illinois, as Kitty attends high school in a small prairie town which the author calls Manitou then returns to the state later to work in Chicago briefly before settling permanently in New York. Morley's story, with its keen realism, was drastically changed for the film version produced in 1941.

Book Review Digest, 1939, p. 691-2.
1120. MORRIS, IRA VICTOR, 1903-
The Chicago Story, A Novel by Ira Morris. Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc.,1952. 347p
See No. 612.
1121. MOTLEY, WILLARD, 1912-1965.
Knock on Any Door. [by] Willard Motley. New York and London: D. Appleton-Century Company, Inc., [1947.] 504p.
Highly acclaimed when first published as one of the best examples of Chicago naturalistic fiction ever written, this vivid and forceful, if somewhat overdrawn, novel describes the way criminals are produced in the slums. The story concerns the life of Nick Romano, and how he changes from a sweet and serious twelve-year-old altar boy, the pride of his family and church, to an unrepentant criminal at age twenty-one, sentenced to die in the electric chair for the murder of a policeman. A motion picture based on the story and produced by Columbia, starred John Derek as Nick and Humphrey Bogart as his defending lawyer.
Book Review Digest, 1947, p. 654-5.
1122. MOTLEY, WILLARD, 1912-1965.
We Fished All Night by Willard Motley. New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., [1951.] 560p.

Shaming democracy for its unfulfilled promises, Motley details the techniques of a corrupt political machine in this powerful novel of World War II and its aftermath. Bitterly attacking war, hypocrisy, bigotry, capitalistic greed, and political corruption, the author uses the lives of three young Chicago men, all representing humble but different backgrounds, to demonstrate the damage these societal evils can inflict on ordinary men and women. Aaron, quiet and lonely would-be poet, impetuously enlists to please his Jewish father, from whom he has received only rejection. Unable to withstand the trauma of the battlefield, he returns after being discharged, broken and out of touch with reality. Jim, handsome and devoted husband and union worker, enlists to serve his ideals, but after experiencing the realities of killing and prostitution he returns plagued by guilt, interested in neither wife nor union. Don ashamed of his Polish name and background, fancying himself a promising actor, is drafted. The death of a close friend and his own battle injuries affect his outlook on life to the point that on his return, he can be easily flattered into becoming a political puppet, quickly casting aside his ideals for a veneer of power and glory.

Book Review Digest, 1951, p. 637.

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Author Index

Title Index

Subject Index