Illinois! Illinois!

Illinois Comes of Age: 1914-1945

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1015. KANTOR, MacKINLAY, 1904-1977.
Diversey, by MacKinlay Kantor. Published in New York: by Coward-McCann, Inc., In the Year MCMXXVIII. 345p.
Marry Javlyn, a promising young journalist from Clay City, Iowa, is enticed to Chicago by the opportunities for professional advancement that the city has to offer. Marry adjusts quickly to his new environment, establishing a liaison with Jo Ruska from across the hall; cultivating a friendship with Steve Gold, a local gangster; and playing politics to get a job in City Hall. Literally speaking, Diversey is the story of one man and the influences that the city has on his character. In a broader sense, it is the story of an entire segment of Chicago society--the segment which inhabits the streets, the Loop, the cabarets, the boardinghouses, City Hall, the elevated trains, and the newsrooms of that teeming metropolis. Kantor's first novel, Diversey has suffered the criticism commonly applied to the works of meritorious young novelists--too long, too ambitious, too tightly knit--but all critics agree that it is a well wrought story and a splendid impression of 1920s Chicago.
Book Review Digest, 1928, p. 418-9.
1016. KANTOR, MacKINLAY, 1904-1977.
El Goes South, By MacKinlay Kantor. Author of Diversey. Published in New York: by Coward-McCann, Inc., In the Year 1930. 297p.

Irma Pavick and Lester Troutwine meet at a time when her life is in turmoil and his permeated with boredom. A short courtship leads to marriage--the second for each--and the beginning of a long period of adjustment for the couple and for Lester's four children, each of whom reacts differently to the new stepmother. Jealousies, family altercations, and tragedies occasionally disrupt the surface calm that typifies the daily lives of the Troutwines and their neighbors in the Chicago suburb of Rogers Park, but the family members make amends and adjust to all changes, pacing their lives always to the tempo of their surroundings. Technically, El Goes South is faultless. If the plot seems to drag, it typifies daily life. If the characters seem deficient in conviction, such is human nature. If life seems as regimented as the elevated train which clatters and screeches through Rogers Park always on schedule, Kantor has achieved his purpose, for his intent is to picture the life of the average Chicagoan as it was lived in the 1920s.

Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 564.
1017. KANTOR, MacKINLAY, 1904-1977.
I Love You, Irene, [by] MacKinlay Kantor. Garden City, New York: Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1972. 347p.

I Love You, Irene is an affectionately reminiscent autobiography, allegedly fictionalized, detailing all the special and trivial memories relating to the courtship and early married life of MacKinlay Kantor and his wife. Chicago, where they meet and are married, is disclosed in busy streets, rooming houses, and department store offices. Some Wisconsin, Canadian, and New York scenes are also included. The book tells of Kantor's determination to be a writer, the painful financial stress that he and Irene endure toward that end, and the gradual coming of success. I Love You, Irene is filled with warmth and humanity, but the absence of Kantor's usual fast-paced story line and the authentic ring in his narrative style tend to classify this work as personalia rather than fiction.

Booklist, 12/15/1972, p. 376. Kirkus, 8/1/1972, p. 907. Library Journal, 9/15/1972, p. 2860. N. Y. Times Book Review, 11/26/1972, p. 38. Publishers' Weekly, 8/7/1972, p. 48.
1018. KANTOR, MacKINLAY, 1904-1977.
It's About Crime, [by] MacKinlay Kantor. [New York:] Published by The New American Library, [1960.] 157p. (A Signet Book)
Eleven short stories give insight into the lives of seasoned criminals and the innocent people who become their prey. "Rogues' Gallery," "Nobody Saw Him Fall," "The Strange Case of Steinkelwintz," "The Light at Three O'clock," and "Wolf, Wolf" are set in Illinois.
CONTENTS: Rogues' Gallery.--Nobody Saw Him Fall.--The Shadow Points.--Sparrow Cop.--The Grave Grass Quivers.--The Strange Case of Steinkelwintz.--Something like Salmon.--Blue Jay Takes the Trail.--The Light at Three O'clock.--Wolf, Wolf!--The Watchman.
N. Y. Times Book Review, 12/25/1960, p. 12.
1019. KAPLAN, BERNARD, 1944-
Obituaries, Fiction by Bernard Kaplan. New York: Grossman Publishers; A Division of The Viking Press, 1976. 168p.
See No. 542.
1020. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Amazing Web, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "The Spectacles of Mr. Cagliostro," "Sing Sing Nights," "The Voice of the Seven Sparrows," Etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., [1930.] 532p.
David Crosby, a young Chicago lawyer, becomes deeply involved in the intrigue surrounding the Rupert van Slyke murder when he is retained as the lawyer for the defense.
Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 568-9.
1021. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
Behind That Mask, A Detective Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1938. 287p.
A hatchet murder on Chicago's lake shore is referred to detective Terry O'Rourke for investigation in this ingenious mystery story from the 1930s. References to events in Keeler's earlier work, Finger! Finger!, along with several chapters lifted verbatim from that work, may discourage or frustrate the reader who recognizes the passages, but each story is unique and worthy of the reading time required.
Book Review Digest, 1938, p. 520.
1022. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Box from Japan, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "The Matilda Hunter Murder," "The Amazing Web," "Sing Sing Nights," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co. Inc., [1932.] 765p.
A seemingly worthless carton purchased for $5.60 at an unclaimed freight auction in Chicago, assumes major importance as the original addressee and others resort to devious means to retrieve it. The Box from Japan is an intricately designed mystery novel true to the Keeler tradition--long and verbose, but ever so suspenseful.
Book Review Digest, 1932, p. 511.
1023. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Case of the Jeweled Ragpicker, by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: Phoenix Press; 419 Fourth Avenue, [1948.] 256p.
Even though it is a murder, the death of Joe, the ragpicker, goes unnoticed but for one glaring incongruence--the victim is stabbed in the back with a $25,000 jewel-studded dagger. A Chicago police detective is unsuccessful in finding either the murderer or the motive, so the case goes into the police records as an unsolved murder. Thirty years later, a write-up of the case in a pulp magazine revives interest, and it is solved by a visiting carnival worker.
1024. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Case of the Lavender Gripsack, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "The Case of the Two Strange Ladies," "Sing Sing Nights," and 38 Other Mystery and Detective Stories. New York: Phoenix Press, Publishers, [1944.] 256p.
The life of John Doe, accused murderer, and the reputation of Elsa Colby, his lawyer, lie in the balance as she tries to prove his innocence with no help and little cooperation. The situation and characters are the same as in Keeler's earlier, Man with the Wooden Spectacles, although the story has been rewritten and changed in many details.
N. Y. Times Book Review, 3/5/1944, p. 18.
1025. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Chameleon, A Mystery-Adventure Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1939. 299p.
The same master of disguise who changes identities repeatedly throughout the pages of The Mysterious Mr. I continues his charades in The Chameleon, while trying to earn the $100,000 reward offered for the return of escaped homicidal maniac Gilrick Sandringham, to the Birkdale Insane Asylum in Kaskawa County, Illinois.
Book Review Digest, 1939, p. 531.
1026. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Face of the Man from Saturn, by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., [1933.] 254p. (Dutton Clue Mystery)

When Jimmie Kentland loses his job with the Chicago Sun for leaving the office unattended in order to cover a reported murder, he turns amateur detective to help solve the case and to collect the reward.

Book Review Digest, 1933, p. 507.

 

1027. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
Find the Clock; A Detective Mystery of Newspaper Life, by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Company; 681 Fifth Avenue, [1927.] 338p.
In addition to the frustration of tracing escaped convict Carl von Tresseler the Blond Beast of Bremen, Jeff Darrell of the Chicago Call must cope with professional jealousy and deliberate misrepresentation of the facts from a rival newspaperman.
Book Review Digest, 1927, p. 399.
1028. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
Finger! Finger! A Mystery Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1938. 536p.

The Thirteenth Coin of Confucius, a talisman that the Chinese people consider a source of strength, is the controlling factor in this mystery novel of plot and counter-plot involving the Chinese and Japanese nations. Beginning in New York, the scene shifts quickly to Chicago.

N. Y. Times Book Review, 3/6/1938, p. 20.

 

1029. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Five Silver Buddhas, A Mystery Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., Publishers, [1935.] 281p.

Superstition is an influencing factor in this mystery novel concerning Penn Harding, who buys one of five silver charms said to bring bad luck. When the owners of the other four charms encounter misfortune one by one, and Harding is likewise suspected of theft, a good luck charm seems the only remedy.

Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 542.
1030. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Fourth King, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "Find the Clock," "The Voice of the Seven Sparrows," "The Spectacles of Mr. Cagliostro," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., [1930.] 317p.

When a male secretary to a disreputable Chicago stock broker finds himself suspected of his employer's murder, he displays great ingenuity in clearing his name and exposing the actual killer.

Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 569.

 

1031. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Green Jade Hand; In Which a New and Quite Different Type of Detective Unravels a Mystery Staged in Chicago, Bagdad on the Lakes, London of the West! by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., [1930.] 327p. (Dutton Clue Mystery)

Simon Grundt, a mental retardate who roams the streets of Chicago during the day and sleeps in the police station at night, solves this complicated mystery which involves the theft of a rare book, a hidden treasure, and a murder.

Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 569.
1032. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Man with the Crimson Box, by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1940. 317p.
The discovery of a skull and its subsequent disappearance from the State's Attorney's office lead to the arrest of an anonymous murder suspect and create a puzzle which has several possible interpretations.
Book Review Digest, 1940, p. 499.
1033. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Man with the Wooden Spectacles, [by] Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Company, Inc., 1941. 378p.

The same skull that created such turmoil in Keeler's earlier novel, The Man with the Crimson Box, reappears in this sequel, with a few new characters and a startlingly different solution to the puzzle.

Book Review Digest, 1941, p. 492.

 

1034. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Mysterious Mr. I, A Detective-mystery Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1938. 247p.
A mysterious sleuth reopens a previously closed murder case and follows a stone-cold trail to a very different conclusion. The trail is illogical; the characters are confusing; the plot is puzzling--even to the reader who persists to the end. But the sequel, entitled The Chameleon, helps somewhat to alleviate the confusion.
Book Review Digest, 1938, p. 520.
1035. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Mystery of the Fiddling Cracksman, by Harry Stephen Keeler. [New York:] E. P. Dutton & Co. Inc., [1934.] 317p. (A Dutton Clue Mystery)
The publication of Billy Hemple's novel, Mr. Monte Zenda of Graustark marks the beginning of an adventure for the young Chicago author even more fantastic than the one he has recently fabricated for publication.
Book Review Digest, 1934, p 505.
1036. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Riddle of the Yellow Zuri, A Mystery Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "The Green Jade Hand," "The Fourth King," "Thieves Nights," "The Amazing Web," "The Spectacles of Mr. Cagliostro," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., [1930.] 294p. (Dutton Clue Mystery)
A missing Indian Zuri snake and a mysterious $20,000 figure prominently in a bizarre detective story filled with surprises, sudden turns of events, and unique characters. The story is set in Chicago.
Book Review Digest, 1931, p. 572.
1037. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Sharkskin Book, A Mystery Novel [by] Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton and Company, Inc., 1941. 287p.
A small volume of Chinese proverbs helps to prove Ogden Farlow's innocence of a crime to which he has previously confessed. Although Farlow is incarcerated in the Niagara City jail, portions of the novel are set in Chicago.
Book Review Digest, 1941, p. 492.
1038. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
Sing Sing Nights, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "Find the Clock," "The Voice of the Seven Sparrows," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Company, Publishers, [1928.] 397p.
Three men on Sing Sing Prison's death row are paid a surprise visit by the governor of New York on the night prior to their executions. In what seems a rather sadistic evenings entertainment, the governor offers a pardon to the man who can tell the most interesting story. Most of the action in the three yarns takes place in Chicago.
Book Review Digest, 1928, p. 421.
1039. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Skull of the Waltzing Clown, by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., Publishers, [1935.] 247p. (A Dutton Clue Mystery)
On his way from Hawaii to Boston, George Stannard stops in Chicago to visit his uncle and becomes a pawn in an intricate insurance swindle.
Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 542.
1040. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Spectacles of Mr. Cagliostro, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "The Voice of the Seven Sparrows," "Find the Clock," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Company, Inc., [1929.] 384p.
Jerry Middleton, son of a Chicago multimillionaire, returns home at his father's death to attend to the family estate. However, he discovers that an adversary has tied up most of his inheritance in a trust, and has planned to have Jerry committed to a mental institution. Jerry is indebted to a stranger for his freedom and doubly indebted to his father for the pair of blue spectacles that enable him to regain his rightful inheritance. Keeler has some very definite opinions on the quality of mental health care in Illinois during the 1920s, and he states his position clearly in these pages, along with some constructive suggestions for improvement. This is one of his best.
Book Review Digest, 1929, p. 502.
1041. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
Thieves' Nights; The Chronicles of DeLancey, King of Thieves, by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "Sing Sing Nights," "The Spectacles of Mr. Cagliostro," "Find the Clock," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., [1929.] 331p.
There is little to shock or incense but plenty to puzzle over in this typically Keeleresque extravaganza of mistaken identities and impersonations which is complicated even more by a busy set of look-alike triplets, the sudden death of a key figure, and the appearance of DeLancey, a criminal of some notoriety.
Book Review Digest, 1929, p. 502.
1042. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Washington Square Enigma, A Mystery Novel by Harry Stephen Keeler. Author of "The Box from Japan," "The Matilda Hunter Murder," "The Amazing Web," "Sing Sing Nights," etc. New York: E. P. Dutton & Co., Inc., 1933. 247p.
Ford Harling, in Chicago searching for a lost promissory note, discovers a dead body and endures all the accompanying involvements.
Book Review Digest, 1933, p. 507.
1043. KEELER, HARRY STEPHEN, 1890-1967.
The Wonderful Scheme of Mr. Christopher Thorne, by Harry Stephen Keeler. New York: E. P. Dutton and Company, Inc., Publishers, [1936.] 503p. (Dutton Clue Mystery)
Mr. Christopher Thorne's schemes encompass everything from business to his daughter's personal life, with disastrous effects for all who get involved. The novel is extraordinarily long, developing New York, Chicago, and New Orleans settings and social backgrounds far more than is necessary for a mystery, but Keeler devotees will enjoy it nonetheless.
N. Y. Times Book Review, 11/15/1936, p. 14.
1044. KOMROFF, MANUEL, 1890-1974.
Coronet, [by] Manuel Komroff. Published in New York: by Coward McCann, Inc., In the year 1929. 2 vols.
A coronet created for the Count de Senlis by the Italian goldsmith, Cappini, in 1600, is the focal point for this epic novel. Symbolizing the decline of aristocracy, the coronet passes through generations of nobility until it is eventually sold to George Mallet, a Chicago meat-packer. Only a portion of the novel deals with Chicago, but Chicago's society of new rich, in which wealth is equated with social position, is treated in a manner equal to that of the French nobility which is traced through more than three centuries.
Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 590-1.
1045. KRAUTTER, ELISA BIALK.
On What Strange Stuff, [by] Elisa Bialk. Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1935. 301p.
Seven lives, seven careers, and seven sets of hopes are traced in this Chicago novel of the Prohibition era. A lawyer, a politician, an artist, an entertainer, a publicity agent, a secretary, and a dreamer are described in incidental fragments, unrelated until the threads are interwoven to form a fabric of ambition and desire, loneliness, and disappointment. The rather arbitrary five-part arrangement with many small sections in each part is not conducive to a smoothly flowing story, but the characters, as they slowly emerge, are believable if a bit too dramatic.
Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 84-5.
1046. LAIT, JACK, 1882-1954.
Beef, Iron and Wine, by Jack Lait. Garden City, NewYork: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1916. 316p.
See No. 549.
1047. LAIT, JACK, 1882-1954.
Gus the Bus and Evelyn, The Exquisite Checker, by Jack Lait. Author of "Beef, Iron and Wine." Garden City, New York: Doubleday, Page & Company, 1917. 342p.
See No. 550.

 

 

1048. LAIT, JACK, 1882-1954.
Put on the Spot, by Jack Lait. Author of The Big House. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, Publishers, [1930.] 212p.
Chicago during the 1920s supplies the background for this tough novel of gangsters and political double-dealing. When the Edgewater Kid is gunned down on the street in front of his apartment building, his moll, Polack Annie, swears revenge on his murderer. The end result is a major underworld massacre planned by the police and executed by an ambitious young gangster who expects to move into the big time. Put on the Spot is obviously based on broadly interpreted fact, for such incidents as the garage massacre of the Gorio Gang are reminiscent of the St. Valentine Day attack on the Capone headquarters. But facts are confused and truth is construed to the point that the story becomes more fiction than fact.
1049. LAKE, JOE BARRY.
The Clean-Up, by Joe Barry, [pseud.] New York: Arcadia House, 1947. 256p.
Rush Henry, Chicago detective, accepts the most difficult challenge of his career when he agrees to clean up Forest City, Illinois. Investigating organized crime in that Chicago suburb during the Capone era, he opens a Pandora's box of gambling, prostitution, violence, and murder.
Book Review Digest, 1947, p. 514.
1050. LAKE, JOE BARRY.
The Fall Guy, by Joe Barry, [pseud.] New York: Mystery House, 1945. 256p.
When her interest in criminal psychology leads Leslie Germaine to attempt some firsthand research in Chicago's underworld, detective Rush Henry is hired to protect her.
Book Review Digest, 1945, p. 38.
1051. LAKE, JOE BARRY.
The Pay-Off, by Joe Barry, [pseud.] New York: Mystery House, 1943. 256p.
Rush Henry uses a ten-day furlough from the Marines to clean up his hometown which is controlled by Chicago gangsters.
Book Review Digest, 1943, p. 45.
1052. LAKE, JOE BARRY.
The Third Degree, by Joe Barry, [pseud.] New York: Mystery House, 1943. 256p.
Rush Henry, Chicago crime reporter turned World War II Army Intelligence Agent, is sent to Detroit on a routine assignment to seek out the source of fake birth certificates that are plaguing the Army. His search soon leads him to Chicago where his routine investigation blossoms into a major case of conspiracy against the United States government.
Book Review Digest, 1943, p. 45.
1053. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
The Best Short Stories of Ring Lardner. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, [1957.] 346p.
Ring Lardner, a newspaper columnist and sports writer whose short stories represent some of the sharpest satire in American literature, has frequently been compared to Mark Twain and Jonathan Swift. Though lacking the humanism of Twain and the intellect of Swift, Lardner has, nonetheless, created a series of short stories which are unsurpassed for their bitter satire of the stupid, inept, and pretentious in American society. The Best Short Stories of Ring Lardner contains twenty-five stories all of which appeared earlier in Round-Up. Five of the twenty-five have Illinois backgrounds: "Champion," "Harmony," "Horseshoes," "Some Like Them Cold," and "Mr. and Mrs. Fix-It."
CONTENTS: The Maysville Minstrel.--I Can't Breathe.--Haircut.--Alibi Ike.--Liberty Hall.--Zone of Quiet.--Mr. Frisbie.--Hurry Kane.--Champion.--A Day with Conrad Green.--Old Folks' Christmas.--Harmony.--The Love Nest.--Ex Parte.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Horseshoes.--There Are Smiles.--Anniversary.--Reunion.--Travelogue.--Who Dealt?--My Roomy.--Some Like Them Cold.--A Caddy's Diary.--Mr. and Mrs. Fix-It.
Book Review Digest, 1958, p. 640-1.
1054. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
The Collected Short Stories of Ring Lardner. New York: The Modern Library, [1941.] 467p.
First published under the title, Round-Up, this volume contains all the material found in the original edition plus a one-page biographical sketch of the author. See No. 1061.
CONTENTS: The Maysville Minstrel.--I Can't Breathe.--Haircut.--Alibi Ike.--Liberty Hall.--Zone of Quiet.--Mr. Frisbie.--Hurry Kane.--Champion.--Contract.--Dinner.--Women.--A Day with Conrad Green.--Old Folks' Christmas.--Harmony.--The Love Nest.--Ex Parte.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Now and Then.--Horseshoes.--There Are Smiles.--Anniversary.--Reunion.--Travelogue.--Who Dealt?--My Roomy.--Rhythm.--Some Like Them Cold.--Nora.--Man Not Overboard.--A Caddy's Diary.--Mr. and Mrs. Fix-It.--A Frame-Up.--Sun Cured.--The Facts.
1055. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
Gullible's Travels, Etc., by Ring W. Lardner. Author of You Know Me, Al, etc. Illustrated by May Wilson Preston. Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Publishers, [1917.] 256p.
Five long short stories--excerpts from the life of one zany couple--detail the traumas of breaking into society, a visit from a maiden sister, an evening at the opera, and a couple of exceptional games of bridge, all told in the popular, uncultured vernacular of early twentieth century Chicago.
CONTENTS: Carmen.--Three Kings and a Pair.--Gullible's Travels.--The Water Cure.--Three Without, Doubled.
1056. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
Haircut, and Other Stories by Ring Lardner. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, [1954.] 190p.
Ten of Lardner's best short stories, all available elsewhere, constitute this volume. "Champion," ''Horseshoes," and "Some Like Them Cold" are set in Illinois
CONTENTS: Haircut.--I Can't Breathe.--Alibi Ike.--Zone of Quiet.--Champion.--A Day with Conrad Green.--The Love Nest.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Horseshoes.--Some Like Them Cold.
1057. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
How to Write Short Stories [With Samples,] by Ring W. Lardner. New York [and] London: Charles Scribner's Sons, MCMXXIV. 359p.

Ten of Ring Lardner's best short stories follow a comic preface which teasingly describes his method of writing. Six of the ten stories concern Chicago in some way: "The Facts," "Some Like Them Cold," "Champion," "A Frame-Up,'' "Harmony," and "Horseshoes."

CONTENTS: The Facts.--Some Like Them Cold.--Alibi Ike.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Champion.--My Roomy.--A Caddy's Diary.--A Frame-Up.--Harmony.--Horseshoes.
Book Review Digest, 1924, p. 338.
1058. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
Lose with a Smile, by Ring W. Lardner. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1933. 174p.
Loquacious letters written by a rookie on the Brooklyn National League baseball team to his girl friend in Centralia, interspersed with her replies, constitute this amusing satire of baseball and middle western Americana. Based on Casey Stengel and Max Carey's 1932 ball club, Lose with a Smile is similar to Lardner's earlier You Know Me, Al.
Book Review Digest, 1933, p. 540-1.
1059. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
The Ring Lardner Reader, Edited by Maxwell Geismar. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, [1963.] 661p.
This collection of Lardner's writings published thirty years after his death contains the author's best fiction offerings as well as a liberal sprinkling of his little known articles, essays, dramas, and parodies. "You Know Me, Al," "Gullible's Travels," "The Facts," Three Without, Doubled," "A Visit to the Garrisons," "Some Like Them Cold," "Champion," "The Young Immigrunts," and "Dinner," are representative of Lardner's Chicago period.
CONTENTS: You Know Me Al, A Busher's Letters.--Gullible's Travels.--Haircut.--The Maysville Minstrel.--Travelogue.--The Facts.--Anniversary.--Quick Returns.--Lady Perkins.--Three Without, Doubled.--A Visit to the Garrisons.--Some Like Them Cold.--I Can't Breathe.--Zone of Quiet.--Champion.--A Caddy's Diary.--"In Conference".--The Love Nest.--A Day with Conrad Green.--Mr. Frisbie.--Sun Cured.--Now and Then.--My Own Beauty Secrets.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Who Dealt?--Liberty Hall.--Contract.--Old Folks Christmas.--Ex Parte.--The Young Immigrunts.--Symptoms of Being 35.--Dinner.--There Are Smiles.--Say It with Oil.--Marriage Made Easy.--Table Manners.--Dogs.--Alibi Ike.--My Roomy.--Hurry Kane.--Nora.--Rhythm.--Tips on Horses.--How Winners Quit Winners.--Salt Water Fishing.--The Origin of Football.--New Golf Accessories.--A Yacht Race.--A World's Serious.--Night and Day.--Sane Olympics.--Thompson's Vacation.--Clemo Uti.--"The Water Lilies".--I, Gaspiri.--Quadroon.--Dinner Bridge.--Cora, or Fun at a Spa.--Abend Di Anni Nouveau.--Taxidea Americana.--How to Tell a True Princess.--Cinderella.--Red Riding Hood.--Bluebeard.--A Bedtime Story.--How to Write Short Stories.--The Love Nest.--The Story of a Wonder Man.--A Close-Up of Domba Splew.--Don't Be a Drudge.--Segregate the Fats.--What of It?
Book Review Digest, 1963, p. 595.
1060. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
Ring Lardner's Best Stories; Including, Haircut, Alibi Ike, The Golden Honeymoon, and all the other brilliant stories originally collected in Round-Up--Together with his inimitable novel of a not-so-dumb Mid-Westerner in the wilds of New York entitled, The Big Town. With a Foreword by William McFee. DeLuxe Edition. Garden City, New York: Garden City Publishing Co., Inc., [1938.] 563p.
The complete texts of Round-Up and The Big Town make up this collection of Lardner at his best.
CONTENTS: The Maysville Minstrel.--I Can't Breathe.--Haircut.--Alibi Ike.--Liberty Hall.--Zone of Quiet.--Mr. Frisbie.--Hurry Kane.--Champion.--Contract.--Dinner.--Women.--A Day with Conrad Green.--Old Folks' Christmas.--Harmony.--The Love Nest.--Ex Parte.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Now and Then.--Horseshoes.--There Are Smiles.--Anniversary.--Reunion.--Travelogue.--Who Dealt?--My Roomy.--Rhythm.--Some Like Them Cold.--Nora.--Man Not Overboard.--A Caddy's Diary.--Mr. and Mrs. Fix-It.--A Frame-Up.--Sun Cured.--The Facts.--The Big Town.
1061. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
Round Up, The Stories of Ring W. Lardner. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, MCMXXIX. 467p.
The best short stories of Ring Lardner are included in this well-known volume which is fast achieving classic status. Eight of thirty-five stories have Illinois backgrounds: '"Champion," "'Dinner," "Harmony," "Horseshoes," "Some Like Them Cold," "Mr. and Mrs. Fix-It," "A Frame-Up," and "The Facts."
CONTENTS: The Maysville Minstrel.--I Can't Breathe.--Haircut.--Alibi Ike.--Liberty Hall.--Zone of Quiet.--Mr. Frisbie.--Hurry Kane.--Champion.--Contract.--Dinner.--Women.--A Day With Conrad Green.--Old Folks' Christmas.--Harmony.--The Love Nest.--Ex Parte.--The Golden Honeymoon.--Now and Then.--Horseshoes.--There Are Smiles.--Anniversary.--Reunion.--Travelogue.--Who Dealt?--My Roomy.--Rhythm.--Some Like Them Cold.--Nora.--Man Not Overboard.--A Caddy's Diary.--Mr. and Mrs. Fix-It.--A Frame-Up.--Sun Cured.--The Facts.
Book Review Digest, 1929, p. 540.
1062. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
Treat 'Em Rough; Letters from Jack the Kaiser Killer, by Ring W. Lardner. Author of My Four Weeks in France, Gullible's Travels, Etc. Illustrated by Frank Crerie. Indianapolis: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Publishers, [1918.] 160p.

Jack Keefe of Lardner's earlier publication, You Know Me, Al, again takes pen in hand to express his opinions of life--this time life in boot camp. Drafted for the duration of World War I, Jack is sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, for basic training. In his usual blustery style Jack writes to his friend Al about army routine, barracks life, his anticipated promotion, his prowess on the football field, and a variety of other soldierly activities, all liberally seasoned with references to his first love, baseball.

1063. LARDNER, RING WILMER, 1885-1933.
You Know Me, Al, A Busher's Letters, by Ring W. Lardner. New York: George H. Doran Company, [1916.] 247p.

Letters written by Jack Keefe, a professional baseball player, to his friend Al, at home, give a blow-by-blow account of Keefe's tribulations in the big leagues. Originally bought by the Chicago White Sox, he is sold to San Francisco, re-bought by Chicago, and eventually passed on to the New York Giants. Through it all Jack complains, boasts, makes excuses, talks too much, and thinks too little. He writes graphically of each game he plays, his love affairs, his marriage, his constant battles with managers, and his financial finagling. Yet, Jack never gains the sympathy of the reader, for he begins the story as a clod and maintains that image to the end. You Know Me, Al reflects the author's background as a sports writer, with detailed descriptions of game after game interspersed with a few lines of tongue-in-cheek comment concerning the action on the playing field or the intervening hours between games. Although the writing is accurate and clever, it lacks the sparkle of Lardner's short stories.

N. Y. Times Book Review, 7/30/1916, p. 303. N. Y. Times Book Review, 4/19/1925, p. 1.
1064. LATIMER, JONATHAN WYATT, 1906-1983.
Headed for a Hearse, [by] Jonathan Latimer. With the aid of a lime squeezer, a monkey wrench, a stop watch, and a deep-sea diver, Bill Crane saves an innocent man from the gallows. Garden City, N[ew] Y[ork:] Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., MCMXXXV. 306p.
Racing against time, William Crane attempts to prove the innocence of convicted murderer Robert Westland, whose scheduled execution is only six days away.
Book Review Digest, 1935, p. 581.
1065. LATIMER, JONATHAN WYATT, 1906-1983.
The Lady in the Morgue, [by] Jonathan Latimer. Not the least of Crane's worries were a drunken bulldog, a stolen corpse and a taxi dancer. Garden City, N[ew] Y[ork:] Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday Doran & Co., Inc., 1936. 296p.

In this 1930s vintage mystery novel, madcap detective William Crane plays hide-and-seek in and about Chicago with a very elusive corpse.

Book Review Digest, 1936, p. 573.
1066. LATIMER, JONATHAN WYATT, 1906-1983.
The Latimer Big Three, [by] Jonathan Latimer. In One Volume: Three Complete Novels of Crime and Detection by a Master Writer of Mystery Fiction. New York: The Sun Dial Press, [1940.] 296, 261, 313p. (Sun Dial Mysteries)
Three novels based on the adventures of detective William Crane are reprinted in their entirety in this large volume. Only The Lady in the Morgue is set in Illinois.
CONTENTS: The Lady in the Morgue.--The Dead Don't Care.--Murder in the Madhouse.
1067. LATIMER, JONATHAN WYATT, 1906-1983.
Red Gardenias, [by] Jonathan Latimer. New York: Published for The Crime Club, Inc., by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc., 1939. 280p.
The deaths of several people by carbon monoxide poisoning plus a threat to the life of a wealthy Brookfield, Illinois, industrialist lead Bill Crane into a strange murder case which he solves in his own unique style.
Book Review Digest, 1939, p. 571-2
1068. LAWRENCE, CATHERINE ANN, 1921-
The Narrowing Wind, by Catherine Lawrence. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1944. 214p. (Intercollegiate Literary Fellowship Prize Novel)
Leaving the farm for a factory job in Chicago is the greatest adventure in Shane's life. Well accustomed to hard work, she enjoys the challenges presented by production rates and city living. She learns how to handle the factory toughs and finds her first boyfriend among her co-workers. But production rates and boyfriends can be empty prizes, and Shane has much to learn about people as her judgment and values mature.
Book Review Digest, 1944, p. 444.
1069. LAWSON, DONALD ELMER, 1917-1990.
A Brand for the Burning, [by] Don Lawson. London, New York [and] Toronto: Abelard-Schuman, [1961.] 254p.
Lawson seems to have difficulty in determining who will be hero in A Brand for the Burning, for Mark Erikson is overshadowed first by his strong willed grandmother then by his Uncle Bill. Nor does Mark's character emerge until Mutter Brosi is dead and Bill Erickson has absconded with the remnants of the family treasury. But it is Mark's story, and all others are only background for his high school and college years and his military service during World War II. Lawson has been meticulous in describing time and place, often to the detriment of the characterization. But he does interpret authentically the prosperity following World War I, the frivolity of the 1920s, the Depression of the 1930s, and the strong feeling of nationalism brought on by World War II. The setting is the west Chicago suburb of Maple Grove.
1070. LEVIN, MEYER, 1905-1981.
Citizens, A Novel by Meyer Levin. New York: The Viking Press, MCMXL. 650p.

The Memorial Day slaying of ten steel workers in Chicago in 1937 is fictionalized in this dramatic and convincing defense of the strikers. The author takes up, one after another, the lives of the victims, and weaves their stories into a realistic presentation of the events of that tragic day and the year that follows. As explained in the author's note at the conclusion of the novel, the lives of the ten people slain are drawn largely from his imagination, while the events themselves follow closely the newspaper reports. The story is chiefly seen from the point of view of a young physician with no previous labor connections who agrees to be on hand for the parade in case of any emergency. An eyewitness to the slayings, he stays to care for the wounded and dying and becomes more deeply involved as the causes and effects are analyzed during the following year.

Book Review Digest, 1940, p. 551-2.
1071. LEVIN, MEYER, 1905-1981.
Compulsion, by Meyer Levin. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956. 495p.

Compulsion is based on the Leopold-Loeb case in which two wealthy and intelligent Chicago youths plot the kidnapping of a fourteen-year-old boy, attempt to collect a ransom of $10,000, then murder the boy and mutilate the body for thrills. The novel attempts to supply motive and understanding for an act which has been labeled "The Crime of the Century." Since Compulsion is fiction, the author has taken liberties with the names of the murderers as well as the defense lawyer (Clarence Darrow) who pleaded a remarkable case in spite of adverse publicity and strong public opinion against the two young men, but the facts are here and easily recognizable. Viewed through the eyes of a cub reporter who has been a university student with the principals in the case, the novel gives first-hand, intimate views of both youths, probing their home backgrounds, family relations, friendships, loves, and philosophies

Book Review Digest, 1956, p. 562.
1072. LEVIN, MEYER, 1905-1981.
Frankie and Johnnie, A Love Story, by Meyer Levin. New York: The John Day Company, [1930.] 212p.
Frankie and Johnnie is a kiss-by-kiss account of a vacuous romance between two young people in Chicago in the 1920s. A bit monotonous but generally true of life, this description of a first love and its disappointments and frustrations reveals much about the mores of the day and makes an interesting documentary of the sexual code of a bygone era; however, as a novel it doesn't compare with Levin's later works.
Book Review Digest, 1930, p. 621-2.
1073. LEVIN, MEYER, 1905-1981.
The Old Bunch, [by] Meyer Levin. New York: Simon and Schuster, [1937.] 964p.
An outstanding example of the Chicago naturalistic novel of the 1930s, this classic of Jewish life in America is pieced together out of fragmentary episodes in the lives of its numerous principals. As one fragment is piled on top of another, a pattern emerges, giving expression to the sometimes virtuous but mostly decadent society of that era. The old bunch consists of about twenty friends, adolescents when the story begins in 1921, who spend the next thirteen years of their lives making their various adjustments to the adult world of Chicago--a world of flappers, racketeers, union strikes, financial reversals, and political boss rule, culminating in the gaudy and glittering Chicago World's Fair of 1933.
Book Review Digest, 1937, p. 596.
1074. LEVIN, MEYER, 1905-1981.
Reporter, A Novel by Meyer Levin. New York: The John Day Company, [1929.] 409p.
Levin's life as a young reporter for a large Chicago newspaper is well described in this chain of unrelated episodes. His fictionalized assignments and the resulting write-ups are presented in believable detail, as are the few personal incidents included, most of which relate to his disappointing attempts to find some semblance of a love life. The book may have been a shocker in its day, with its almost explicit references to abortion and child molestation, but its main value lies in its exposure of the unethical tactics casually employed by reporters in the daily pursuit of the almighty scoop. Most of the events occur in the Chicago-Evanston area; one is set in Quincy.
N. Y. Times Book Review, 3/17/1929, p. 30.
1075. LINDSAY, NICHOLAS VACHEL, 1879-1931.
The Golden Book of Springfield, by Vachel Lindsay, A Citizen of That Town. Being the review of a book that will appear in the autumn of the year 2018, and an extended description of Springfield, Illinois, in that year. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1920. 329p.

Members of the Springfield, Illinois, Prognosticators Club in the year 1918 dream of Springfield as it will be one hundred years in the future. One of the Prognosticators, the narrator himself, is propelled into the year 2018 where he observes and describes the city and its inhabitants in considerable detail. To a modern inhabitant of Springfield this story might be interesting simply from the standpoint of curiosity, but to the general reader the effort required to study the visions and interpret the symbolism with which the book abounds will outweigh the interest generated, and the book will likely be left half read.

Book Review Digest, 1921, p. 252-3.
1076. LINN, JAMES WEBER, 1876-1939.
Winds over the Campus, by James Weber Linn. Author of This Was Life. Indianapolis [and] New York: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, Publishers, [1936.] 344p.
A sequel to This Was Life, Winds over the Campus takes up the affairs of Jerry Grant again forty years after his introduction in the earlier novel. Grant is now a professor at the University of Chicago where he spent his college days, having himself kept pace with the growth of the institution. Here is the novel of academics that the author avoided in This Was Life. Here are the college radicals, the ambitious college president, the dissident professors, and the ever-present students. Winds over the Campus is an authentic novel of college life, reflecting the 1930s as accurately as This Was Life reflects the 1890s. Yet, Winds over the Campus lacks the freshness of its predecessor.
Book Review Digest, 1936, p. 598.
1077. LONDON, JACK, 1876-1916.
The Iron Heel, by Jack London. Author of "The Call of the Wild," "White Fang," Etc. New York: The Macmillan Company; London: Macmillan & Co., Ltd., 1907. 354p.
See No. 562.
1078. LORD, EDA, 1907-1976.
Childsplay, [by] Eda Lord. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1961. 180p.
Sensitive but not sentimental, this story is a poignant reminder that childhood is not always as carefree as is commonly misremembered. The child in the story is introduced at age four to her grandparents in Evanston, and then left with them while her widowed father investigates mining opportunities in Missouri, and incidentally finds himself a wife there. The new stepmother has a son about a year older than the girl, and the two soon become an adventuresome team. The family moves frequently, and sometimes the father and stepmother leave the children in the care of a servant for long periods. Much time is spent in Missouri, Oklahoma, and Tennessee before the story concludes in Evanston in 1917. Although the narrative is told as a recollection from a child's point of view its warmth and insight will probably be best appreciated by mature readers.
Book Review Digest, 1961, p. 872.

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Author Index

Title Index

Subject Index